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Cray X1
 
PIV cluster

PIVIn December, 2003, OSC engineers installed a 512-CPU Pentium 4 Linux Cluster. Replacing the AMD Athlon cluster, the P4 doubled the existing system’s power with a sizable increase in speed. With a theoretical peak of 2,457 gigaflops, the P4 cluster contained 256 dual-processor Pentium IV Xeon systems with four gigabytes of memory per node and 20 terabytes of aggregate disk space.

SGI Altix 3700

SGI Altix 3700In September, 2003, OSC engineers installed a SGI Altix 3700 system to replace its SGI Origin 2000 system and to augment its HP Itanium 2 Cluster. The Altix was a non-uniform memory access system with 32 Itanium processors and 64 gigabytes of memory. The Altix featured Itanium 2 processors and runs the Linux operating system. OSC's HP Cluster also included Itanium 2 processors and runs Linux.

Itanium 2 cluster

In October, 2002, OSC engineers installed the 300-CPU HP Workstation Itanium 2 Linux zx6000 Cluster. OSC selected HP’s computing cluster for its blend of high performance, flexibility and low cost. The HP cluster used Myricom's Myrinet high-speed interconnect and ran the Red Hat Linux Advanced Workstation, a 64-bit Linux operating system.

AMD Linux cluster (MPP)

AMD MPP ClusterOSC engineers in March, 2002, installed a 256-CPU AMD Linux Cluster. The 32-bit Parallel Processing (MPP) system featured one gigabyte of distributed memory, 256 1.4 & 1.53 gigahertz AMD Athlon processors and a Myrinet and Fast Ethernet interconnect.

SunFire 6800

Sunfire 6800In October, 2001, OSC engineers installed four SunFire 6800 midframe servers, with a total of 72 UltraSPARC III processors.

SGI 750 Itanium Cluster

SGI 750 Itanium clusterIn August, 2001, OSC engineers installed a 146-CPU SGI 750 Itanium Linux Cluster, described by SGI as one of the fastest in the world. The system – with 292GB memory, 428GFLOPS peak performance for double-precision computations and 856GFLOPS peak performance for single-precision computations – followed the Pentium® III Xeon™ cluster that had been operated at OSC for the preceding 18 months.

Cray SV1

Cray SV1In October, 1999, OSC engineers installed a Cray SV1 system with 16 custom vector processors at 300MHz and 16GB of memory. The SV1 used complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) processors, which lowered the cost of the system, and allowed the computer to be air-cooled.

Beowulf

In April, 1999, OSC installed a 10-CPU IA32 Linux Cluster as a “Beowulf Cluster,” a system built of commodity off-the-shelf (COTS) components dedicated for parallel use and running an open source operating system and tool set. OSC developed this cluster to create an experimental test bed for testing new parallel algorithms and commodity communications hardware, to design a model system for cluster systems to be set up by members of the OSC user community and to establish a high performance parallel computer system in its own right.

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