Advanced Materials

OSC advanced materials research icon

Ohio researchers are conducting groundbreaking studies of various advanced materials. The creation and testing of computational models through Ohio Supercomputer Center systems continues to set the bar high for materials science research in Ohio.

GERMANANE SHEETS

Just one decade ago, researchers first isolated graphene, a carbon film only one atom thick – essentially a semi-metallic material so thin that it presents only two measurable dimensions, length and width.

CANCER-FIGHTING DRUGS

In 1978, the Food and Drug Administration approved cisplatin, a platinum-based compound, for clinical use. Cisplatin today is widely recognized as an effective cancer-treating drug, but it also is known to cause many severe side effects, such as kidney damage, nervous system impairment, nausea and vomiting.

METAL NANOSTRUCTURE

Scientists at the University of Akron, in collaboration with partners at UCLA, are investigating the unique properties of metal alloy nanostructures – materials measuring 1-1000 nanometers in length – that have potential applications in the manufacture of fuel cells, batteries, automotive catalysts, sensors and nanoeletronic devices.

Enhancing Pavement Engineering

Simulation of cracking concrete slabs

Most American highways are constructed as a Portland cement concrete (PCC) slabs that are poured and finished on a layered roadbed. Such pavement structures are subjected to millions of applications of traffic wheel-loads, as well as numerous cycles of temperature and moisture variations, and eventually succumb to cracking. 

Investigating Nematic Vesicles

Simulation of two vesicles in equilibrium with surfactant molecules in solution

Liquid crystals are at the heart of the technology inside most computer, tablet and smartphone displays today, and researchers are finding more applications for liquid crystals every day – in fields, such as advanced photonics, sensors, bio- and medical molecular devices, and smart materials for new energy applications. 

Evaluating Silica Nanochannels

The amorphous silica nanochannel (red and yellow) confining a stream (red and white) of electrolyte-water solution

Microdevices, such as Labs-On-a-Chip (LOC) systems, are used for biomolecular detection and custom chemical synthesis, among other applications. Over the last decade, LOC systems have evolved from a single channel to systems capable of integrating thousands of reaction vessels, conduits and valves. 

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